Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
Marian Härtel
Marian Härtel
Loading in …3
×
1 of 11

Ladder, Cellar and Utensils - Important Ingredients and Tools for Excellent Cooking

0

Share

Download to read offline

Have you checked if you have all the right cooking supplies and utensils handy? Read this document reproduced by Susan Alexander Truffles to find out which essential items you should have in your kitchen.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Ladder, Cellar and Utensils - Important Ingredients and Tools for Excellent Cooking

  1. 1. Larder, Cellar and Utensils – Important Ingredients and Tools for Excellent Cooking As its title suggests, this copy is intended to help you stock your larder with the ingredients called for in the recipes which precede it, and to store in your cellar the spirits and wines needed for cooking and drinking according to the same recipes and accompanying menus. Presumably you will always have such staples as flour, eggs, butter, lemons, and granulated sugar. They are omitted from the list, as are the vegetables which are suggested to go with the various main dishes. The vegetables listed under "Greengroceries" are those which are included as ingredients in the recipes. Most of them are available either frozen or in tins, and should be at hand, if this book is to fulfil its function. Like Gaul, the section on alcohol is divided into three parts. Part I lists the liquid materials necessary for compounding the pre-brunch drinks described in the last of the recipe sections. Part II contains additional wines and liqueurs called for in the preparation of the other recipes. Part III is a list of the wines most often recommended in the suggested menus which follow a majority of the recipes. I have made no attempt to suggest specific vintages among the imported wines—your wine merchant is well qualified for that—or to differentiate among American wine producers, except in one instance. I have found the pale dry sherry put out by Guild extremely useful, and the same producer's Tavola—a light, dry red wine which should be served chilled— excellent for drinking with certain dishes, especially curry. ▼▼▼
  2. 2. THE LARDER SOUPS Madrilène, Jellied Beef Bouillon Condensed Mushroom, Cream of, Condensed Black Bean, Condensed Onion, French (Campbell's Condensed) Celery, Cream of, Condensed Onion, French (Habitant) Clam Chowder, (Campbell's Condensed) Pea, Cream of, Condensed Chicken, Cream of, Condensed Tomato, Cream of, Condensed Crayfish Bisque, Condensed Turkey Broth Gumbo Creole, Condensed Turtle, Clear Green, (Ancora) Photo owned by Heydrienne HERBS AND SPICES Celery Seed Curry Powder Allspice Chervil Dill Basil, Lemon Chives Fennel Seed Basil, Sweet Cinnamon, Powdered Fines Herbes Bay Leaves Cinnamon, Stick Garlic Capers Cloves, Powdered Garlic, Liquid Caraway Seed Cloves, Whole Garlic, Powdered Celery Leaves Cumin Seed, Ground Ginger, Powdered Gumbo Filé Powder Nutmeg, Powdered Rosemary Horse-radish, Powdered Nutmeg, Whole Saffron Juniper Berries Onion Powder Sage, Rubbed Marjoram Orégano Sage, Powdered Mint Paprika Salt, Beau Monde Seasoning Monosodium Glutamate Parsley Tarragon Mustard, Dry Pepper, Italian, Red Cracked Thyme Mustard, Prepared Peppercorns, Black
  3. 3. PREPARED SEASONINGS & SAUCES Mayonnaise Truffles* Anchovy Paste Bombay Mustard Pickle Oil Vanilla Extract Duck Bouillon Cubes Olive Oil Vinegar, Cider Beef Bovril (or Beef Extract) Wesson Orange Extract Vinegar, Red Wine Chicken Extract Scotch Bonnet* Walnuts, Pickled Chili Sauce Chutney Soy Sauce Juice Worcestershire Sauce Ketchup Tabasco Sauce Kitchen Bouquet Tomato Juice *Scotch Bonnet is one of the hottest peppers known. It grows, among other places, in the vicinity of Philadelphia, where John Wagner and Sons combine it with sherry to make a condiment which is, so far as I know, unique. *Truffles are wild mushrooms that grow in certain countries only. They have an intense aroma and a distinct taste that can make dishes delectable. Photo owned by Wazouille GREEN GROCERIES Mushrooms, Button Artichoke Bottoms Olives, Green Stuffed Artichoke Hearts, Baby, in Olive Oil Olives, Ripe Bean Sprouts Parsley, Fresh Broccoli Spears, Frozen Peas, Frozen Chives, Fresh Pimiento Mint, Fresh Spinach, Baby Food Mushrooms, "Bits and Pieces" Spinach, Chopped Frozen
  4. 4. PREPARED MEATS & SEAFOOD Lobster Stew (Jack August's) Anchovy Fillet Oysters, Smoked, Japanese Flat Caviar Chicken, Boned Salmon, Smoked, Frozen Sausage, Vienna Clam Juice Sardines, Norwegian Clams, Minced Sardines, Portuguese, Skinless Clams, Soft (Underwood's) Shrimp Ham, Baked, Sliced Tuna Fish Ham, Prosciutto Turtle Meat, Green (Ancora) Lobster Meat, Canadian FARINACEOUS PRODUCTS, ETC. Noodles, Long Almonds, Tinned Oyster Crackers (Trenton) Bread Crumbs Oysterettes Cheese, Blue Ravioli in Tomato Sauce Cheese, Parmesan Rice, Long Grain Chocolate Wafers, Thin Rice, Wild, Tinned Cornstarch Saltines English Muffins Spaghetti, Thin French Bread, Half-Cooked Toast, Melba Macaroni, Elbow Water Biscuit (Carr's) SWEETS Cherries Chocolate Shot Bing Cherries Ginger Maraschino Canton Ginger Green Cherries Crystallized Sugar Red Chocolate Brown Sugar Semi-Sweet (Baker's) Confectioners ▼▼▼ THE CELLAR—PART I Items required for compounding pre-brunch drinks and one cocktail: SPIRITS Applejack Vodka Cognac Whisky, Rye Gin, London Dry Chablis Champagne Rum, Jamaica Dubonnet Sherry Rum, Puerto Rico, Dark Pale Dry Sherry Rum, Puerto Rico, Light Oloroso Vermouth, Dry
  5. 5. MALT Stout Guinness NON-ALCOHOLIC Tomato Juice Bitters, Angostura Barbera* Bitters, Orange Chianti Cider, Sweet Chambertin Lime Juice, Rose's Unsweetened Margaux* Soda, Canada Dry Saint-Julien Tavola* WHITE Barsac Graves* Chablis Piesporter* Champagne Riesling Photo owned by Agne ROSE Sainte Roseline* Tavel Following are the other wines suggested in the menus. RED Pommard Barol o Richebourg Beaujolais Traminer Gamay Zinfandel
  6. 6. WHITE Liebfraumilch Montrachet Chianti Frascati Niersteiner Orvieto Lachryma Christi Pouilly Fuissé ▼▼▼ THE CELLAR—PART II In addition to the potables listed in Part I, you will also require for cooking the following: MALT Beer WINK Malmsey Burgundy Marsala Claret Port Madeira Riesling LIQUEURS Crème de Menthe, Green Kirsch ▼▼▼ THE CELLAR—PART III Thirty odd wines are mentioned in the various menus suggested in this book. Most are mentioned only a few times and need not be stocked in the cellar. Fourteen wines: six red, six white, and two rose, will give you a very fine cellar indeed and one which will enable you to delight your guests on almost any occasion. If space is a problem, the list can be reduced even further to three reds, four whites, and one rose. The first group below is comprised of the fourteen wines suggested as belonging in your wine cellar. Those marked with an asterisk are the ones I would eliminate to economize on space. A case each of the remaining eight will answer all normal requirements. SAKE ROSÉ Sauterne Bouquet de Provence Vouvray ▼▼▼
  7. 7. UTENSILS Any piece of work, whether it be bricklaying, plumbing, or ship-model building is made easier if you have the proper tools. Without them any job is a chore and is sometimes impossible; with them almost any type of work can be fun. This truism applies to cooking. You can improvise a double boiler from two saucepans, you can whip egg whites with a fork, you can substitute a knife for a spatula, but you will have to work harder and the results are apt to suffer. With kitchen tools, as with the ingredients of recipes, quality is of the first importance. Knives, for example, should be of forged steel to hold an edge. They should be kept sharp with a knife sharpener and a steel. A dull knife is not only difficult to use; it is also dangerous. Hand egg beaters should be the best obtainable, with nylon gears, even though they cost more than the ten-cent-store variety. One can make do with an old-fashioned hand- held can opener, but why risk maiming yourself when a wall opener will do safely in seconds what the other type will do dangerously in minutes? If you must live dangerously, do it in some room other than the kitchen, unless, of course, you like the taste of human blood in your stew. This section on utensils is intended to assist you in equipping your kitchen with the small appliances and gadgets you will need to make cooking a pleasure. It includes all the tools mentioned in the various recipes, and additional ones as well. Some of these latter items are nonessential, but are definitely pluses. They are indicated by asterisks. You will find them ever-present helps, not only in troublous times, but in all others. The non-asterisked tools are required. BAKING PANS, SHALLOW, OBLONG 1 small* 1 large 1 medium 1 serving platter Photo owned by Tracy Hunter
  8. 8. BEAN SHREDDER BLENDER CASSEROLES 1 two-quart, with lid 1 deep, with lid 1 one-quart, with lid 8 individual ramekins CHAFING DISH* CHEESECLOTH COCKTAIL SHAKERS 1 Black Velvet pitcher, two-quart* 1 large 1 martini mixer 1 medium* 1 punch bowl* COFFEEPOTS 1 four-cup 1 two-cup* 1 eight-cup COLANDERS 1 without feet* 1 with feet Photo owned by Florent Pecassou COOKIE SHEET* CORKSCREW, MECHANICAL EGG BEATERS 1 hand-operated 1 portable electric* FORKS l two-tined long-handled 1 silver, for salad dressings GARLIC PRESS* GLASSES 8 hollow-stem, beer 8 twelve-ounce 8 Rhine wine 8 ten-ounce* 8 Claret* 8 six-ounce 8 Burgundy 8 old-fashioned 8 punch cups*
  9. 9. GLASS SERVING BOWLS 1 large* 1 medium* GRATERS 1 flat 1 Mouli 1 nutmeg, mechanical* ICE MALLET ICE BAG* KNIVES 1 two-and-a-half-inch paring* 1 six-inch boning* 1 four-inch paring 1 bread 1 five-inch paring 1 ten-inch French 1 tomato slicer, serrated edge* 1 twelve-inch slicer 1 sharpener 1 eight-inch slicer* 1 steel LEMON SQUEEZER MEASURING CUPS 1 one-pint 1 half-pint 1 one-quart* LEMON SQUEEZER MEASURING CUPS 1 one-pint 1 half-pint 1 one-quart* Photo owned by Niklas Morberg MIXING BOWLS 1 set, five assorted sizes 2 miscellaneous, small* OPENERS Jar, Gilhoolie* Beer tin 6 six-inch* Bottle Tin, wall type Jar, E-Z Lift* Tin, Edlund Junior #5
  10. 10. ORANGE SQUEEZER* PEPPER MILL PANCAKE TURNER SALAD BASKET FOR WASHING GREENS* SALAD BOWLS 1 large 1 medium SAUCEPANS 1 four-quart, with lid 1 one-quart, with lid 1 five-quart, with lid 2 two-quart, with lid 1 double boiler, 1 quart* 1 three-quart, with lid* 1 double boiler, 2 quarts SIEVES 1 fine 1 coarse SIFTER, FLOUR SKEWERS 12 three-inch* 6 six-inch* SKILLETS 1 twelve-inch, with lid* l six-inch, with lid* 1 ten-inch, with lid 1 ten-inch, cast iron, for omelettes 1 ten-inch, with lid l eight-inch, cast iron, for omelettes Photo owned by Suricata SPATULAS 1 large and 1 small SPOONS 1 tablespoon* l set of three, wooden 1 long-handled, large 1teaspoon* l set measuring 2 stirring, medium (¼-, ½-, 1-teaspoon, 1-tablespoon)
  11. 11. STEAM BASKET (IN-GENIA)* TOOTHPICKS, WOODEN SWIRL MIXERS, 2 ROCHOW TYPE TEAKETTLE, TWO-QUART VINEGAR CRUET TOASTER, ELECTRIC* WHISK, WIRE This reproduction is made possible by Susan Alexander Truffles.

×