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14 Simple Salad Recipes for All Occasions

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Do you know that there are more ways to prepare salads than just tossing an odd mix of green vegetables and dressing? Check out this document reproduced by Susan Alexander Truffles for more varied salad dishes that you can serve for all occasions.

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14 Simple Salad Recipes for All Occasions

  1. 1. 14 Simple Salad Recipes for All Occasions Salads are myriad in type and infinite in variety. Listed here are a few—a generous baker's dozen, or fourteen—suitable for following main courses at luncheon, dinner, and supper. Such things as chef's salad, crab, chicken, lobster, or tuna fish salad are or should be meals in themselves and have no place in a section dealing with an entirely different type. I have, therefore, omitted them. For a similar reason I have omitted varieties of fruit salad which are really desserts. Other combinations, such things as pineapple and cottage cheese; or bananas, sharp cheese, and maraschino cherries are not salads, either, but desserts, if they are anything, and belong strictly on drugstore menus. The salads described are appropriate with most of the recipes which precede them. Which salad you use with which recipe is, of course, a matter of individual taste. Salad bowls should be of wood and never used for anything but salads. They should not be washed with soap and water, but sponged out with a warm, damp cloth. Whether your salad spoon and fork are wood or silver, they should have flat handles. Nothing is more difficult to manipulate with one hand than a salad fork and spoon with rounded handles. I know of no simple or even complex way to measure the quantity of greens such as lettuce, Chinese cabbage, or chicory which goes into a salad, unless you count the leaves, which seems silly. Your own good sense will have to be your guide. The quantities will depend, of course, on the size of your party and the number and type of dishes which the salad is to follow.
  2. 2. It is not exactly true to say that a salad is known by the dressing it takes, but by varying the dressing you can change a salad quite radically. Judicious combining of the salads and the dressings described in this and the following sections will enable you to serve a goodly number more salads than are mentioned here. There are only a few basic salad dressings, of which the two most important are French and mayonnaise. The former is simplicity itself to make, the latter is more complex. French dressing you will, of course, make yourself, but commercially prepared mayonnaise is adequate for most purposes and may be used successfully where mayonnaise is required for any of the salads or dressings described. If you want to flavour a salad with garlic—and who does not from time to time?—remember that it should not go into the salad itself, and preferably not in the dressing. Cut a clove in half and rub the bowl vigorously with the cut end. Better, though a little more work, is to place a clove of garlic in the bowl, cover it with half a teaspoon of salt, and, using the bowl of a tablespoon, grind the salt and garlic together into the wood. The salt minces the garlic and flavours the bowl with the juice. After the bowl has been well covered, discard the debris and put in the salad greens. Except in rare instances salads should be kept under refrigeration until they are to be served, and the dressing added at the last minute. ▼▼▼ MIXED GREEN SALAD This recipe is a bargain—you get three salads for the price of one —and probably the most useful in the whole salad family. The simple mixed green or tossed salad is capable of almost endless variation. It may contain a few or nearly all kinds of leafy vegetables. Always make it in a bowl which will allow ample room to toss, turn, or fold the ingredients so as to coat them thoroughly with the dressing. The greens should not be cut into small bits, but broken by hand or shredded with a silver knife into pieces of moderate size, the three recipes differ only slightly in content, but the difference in taste, while not a "vive" one, is definite. Photo owned by Albert Cahalan MIXED GREEN SALAD I CHINESE CABBAGE ICEBERG LETTUCE
  3. 3. CHICORY ROMAINE SPRING ONIONS CARROTS Chop a small quantity of Chinese cabbage into the bottom of the bowl. Add the shredded eaves of iceberg lettuce, chicory, and romaine. Slice, not too fine, two or three spring onions, including part of the green tops, and a large carrot over the leaves. Place in a refrigerator until ready to serve. You can alter the taste of this salad radically by adding a few sprigs of fresh parsley. ▼▼▼ MIXED GREEN SALAD II To accompany certain foods such as Spaghetti Bianca, Chicken Tetrazzini, or Beef Alhambra, add to the above: fresh tomatoes. Cut them into narrow wedges and arrange around the perimeter of the bowl on top of the salad, with a quarter of a tomato in the center. You may omit the carrot and if you like add thinly sliced, unpeeled cucumber. ▼▼▼ MIXED GREEN SALAD III The third variety of mixed green salad is very bland and goes well with such dishes as Curry, Lasagne, or Turkey Prosciutto. It should be made with fresh greens, if possible immediately out of the garden. Serve it always with French Dressing (qv). BOSTON LETTUCE ROMAINE CHICORY ESCAROLE Wash the leaves thoroughly in running cold water to remove all dirt and grit. Dry the leaves between towels. Break them into large pieces by hand and place in a bowl. If you must give spice to this delicate salad, sprinkle a few, fresh-chopped chives over it before adding the dressing. ▼▼▼ SALADE BELGIQUE SERVES 4 Salade Belgique is at the same time the simplest and, to my taste, the best of all possible salads. It should be served as part of the best of all possible dinners, when appetite has been satisfied, not sated, and all you desire is a little tart crispness to conclude the meal or to make
  4. 4. a refreshing transition from hearty fare to a simple dessert or cheese. It is too, an almost perfect complement to an omelette or to scrambled eggs. 6 STALKS BELGIAN ENDIVE Remove any yellowed leaves and cut off the bottoms. Chop the endive crosswise with a sharp knife into pieces about an inch long. Place alone in a salad bowl and pour Mustard Dressing (qv)—without too much mustard—over the endive. Mix well and serve. Delicious. ▼▼▼ COVENT GARDEN SALAD SERVES 4 During World War II when normal salad greens were in short supply or nonexistent, this type of salad appeared in many English homes and restaurants. The salad calls for raw vegetables which are usually served cooked. The list below is by no means exhaustive, and could include spinach, celery, cucumbers, radishes, and others, but I think the salad is more fun if it does not contain more than one vegetable—in this case a carrot—normally found in salads. The combination is very crisp, but, compared to a mixed green salad, say, just a little heavy and it does better after a reasonably light meal. 12 LARGE BRUSSELS SPROUTS 1 LEEK 1 LARGE CARROT 24 SNAP BEANS 1 MEDIUM TURNIP 1 SMALL CAULIFLOWER FRENCH DRESSING Wash the sprouts well, and remove the outer leaves and stems. Cut into quarters. Chop the leek coarsely, including a little of the green, and wash it very well in running water. Dry on a towel and then chop it again, but not too fine. Shred the carrot and the beans, or cut the: latter into pieces about half an inch long. Dice the turnip. Separate the flowers of the cauliflower into single buds. Place the raw vegetables in a salad bowl and pour the French Dressing (qv) over them. Mix well. This should be done before the meal so that the vegetables marinate in the dressing for about an hour before being served. Keep in the refrigerator or cover with a damp cloth. ▼▼▼
  5. 5. GREENBRIER SALAD SERVES 4 Famous for its cuisine as well as for its golf courses—whatever happened to that old word "links"?—the Greenbrier Hotel at White Sulphur Springs serves this delicious combination at luncheon. It is a simple dish but very good and very pretty. 1 LARGE BEET, COOKED 1 BUNCH WATER CRESS 2 STALKS BELGIAN ENDIVE Cut the beet into small dice. Remove the thick stems from the water cress, wash it, and dry it on a towel. Separate the leaves of the endive and arrange them in the bottom of a salad bowl. Sprinkle the diced beet over the endive, and toss in the water cress. Serve with French Dressing (qv). ▼▼▼ DOUBLE CRESSED SALAD SERVES 4 When I was a small boy living in a small town in Pennsylvania, there was a small religious sect there which believed in total immersion —its members presumably had other tenets too. For baptismal purposes they used an old mill pond where grew the town's supply of water cress. I never eat water cress today without thinking how much better it used to taste. Unfortunately that source of supply is no longer available, and you will have to be content with what you grow yourself or can buy at the greengrocer's. Unfortunately, too, you cannot make this salad all year round because its special goodness requires the inclusion of land cress, which is seasonal. This salad is most meritorious after steak. 1 BUNCH WATER CRESS 1 BUNCH LAND CRESS 1 SMALL TURNIP 1 MEDIUM CARROT 2 SPRING ONIONS Remove the thick stems, wash the cress well, and dry in a towel. Cut the turnip into dice, and the carrot and onions into short thin slices. Arrange the cress in the bottom of a salad bowl. Add the other ingredients. Serve with French Dressing (qv) or Mustard Dressing (qv). ▼▼▼
  6. 6. SPINACH SALAD SERVES 6 The butt of innumerable semi-comic jokes, maligned by all children and many adults, and subjected to every conceivable type of culinary mistreatment, spinach remains one of the most valuable and humble of vegetables. Despite its humility, it responds well to sophisticated handling, when it becomes a basic food of high nutritive value and good taste. Photo owned by Cyclone Bill Creamed with a little onion, it ranks among the great vegetable dishes; puréed, it is essential to Eggs Florentine; raw, it makes a salad which can be called only edifying. One drawback spinach has: it requires intensive washing in cold water to eliminate the grit which invariably accompanies it. You may speed this process by using the bags (10 ounces) of cleaned spinach now available in most food stores. Even this must be washed in tepid water. 1 BAG FRESH, CRISP SPINACH 1 SMALL CUCUMBER 1 BUNCH SMALL RADISHES Wash the spinach thoroughly, remove the thick stems, and place the leaves in a large salad bowl. Score the sides of the cucumber deeply with a fork, but do not peel. Slice it very thin and arrange the slices to cover the spinach. Wash the radishes but do not peel. Sprinkle them casually over the cucumbers. Serve with French Dressing (qv) or Mustard Dressing (qv). A little garlic rubbed in the bowl will add zest to this tangy salad. ▼▼▼ AVOCADO SALAD SERVES 4 This is a quick salad but so rich and filling that its use is limited almost: exclusively to menus whose main courses are composed of broiled or roasted food. With them it may well replace a green vegetable. It could almost be a meal in itself. Perhaps avocados are best when sliced thin and put into a mixed green salad needing a little more body but to which you do not wish to add tomatoes.
  7. 7. 2 RIPE, MEDIUM AVOCADOS 3 RASHERS BACON ½ CUP FRENCH DRESSING 4 LEAVES ROMAINE Cut the avocados in half, remove the seeds, peel the fruit. Fry the bacon until crisp, drain and mince it. Put the minced bacon into the French Dressing (qv), stir, and pour an equal quantity into the cavity of each avocado. Serve cold on the romaine leaves. ▼▼▼ MANGOLEEKEE SALAD SERVES 4 A salad with fruit in it normally belongs in the category of desserts, not salads. A distinction is made in this case because the taste of mangoes and leeks is so complementary that they should be combined much more often than they are, and leeks do not do too well in a dessert. This is a remarkable salad which will not only titillate the taste buds and stimulate the phagocytes but will also serve as a conversation piece, a consideration of moment at some parties. Fortunately the leek season and the mango season coincide in the United States. The salad should be served chilled and with French Dressing (qv). 6 MEDIUM LEEKS ½ HEAD LETTUCE 1 LARGE MANGO Trim the leeks, removing about half the green tops. Wash them well, and place them in a saucepan of boiling water. Bring to a boil again, and let the leeks cook about six minutes. Drain the leeks and place them in the refrigerator to cool. (They may be cooked the day or even two days before they are needed.) Separate the lettuce, wash it, dry it between towels, and arrange in the bottom of a salad bowl. Peel the mango, and cut it into narrow slices about an eighth of an inch thick. Arrange the slices on the lettuce. Chop the leeks, including some of the green tops, into pieces about an inch long. Distribute over the mangoes. Add the dressing, toss well, and serve. ▼▼▼ PERSIMMON SALAD SERVES 4 Not quite so unusual as Mangoleekee Salad, one made with persimmons belongs in the same category. It, too, is seasonal and most suitable at a fairly elaborate meal when something plain but tangy and "different"— again like Mangoleekee it is sure to lead to talk-is required for a salad course. Land or field cress "does more" for the persimmons than does water cress, but made with either this is a notable salad. The persimmons should be firm but ripe; green ones could have unfortunate effects on your guests, and on you, too.
  8. 8. 4 PERSIMMONS 2 BUNCHES LAND CRESS FRENCH DRESSING Skin the persimmons by dousing each for a few moments in rapidly boiling water and peeling off the skin against a knife blade as you peel tomatoes. Remove the thicker stems from the cress. Wash it well in cold water, and dry between towels. Arrange the cress in a salad bowl. Cut the peeled persimmons into quarters. Place them in the bowl on the bed of cress. Just before serving add the French Dressing (qv), and toss the salad well. ▼▼▼ COLE SLAW MABEL SERVES 4 For many years this cole slaw has accompanied all fish and most seafood—note the distinction—dishes in a home I am wont to frequent. It is so different from and so much better than the watery, insipid! mess of dead white, old tired cabbage and mayonnaise thinned with milk, which frequently masquerades as cole slaw in some seafood restaurants and in all cafeterias, that I asked Mabel how she did it. Here's how. Photo owned by Takeaway ½ SMALL CABBAGE 1 LARGE CARROT 1 MEDIUM GREEN PEPPER ½ TEASPOON SUGAR ½ TEASPOON SALT ½ TEASPOON PEPPER ½ TEASPOON CELERY SEED ½ CUP MAYONNAISE 1 TABLESPOON WHITE WINE VINEGAR
  9. 9. JUICE ½ LEMON TABASCO Shred the cabbage fine with a sharp knife. Julienne the carrot and the green pepper into pieces not more than an inch long. Put in a bowl, add sugar, salt, pepper, and celery seed. Using your fingers, mix the seasoning well with the vegetables. In another bowl put the mayonnaise, add the vinegar, lemon juice, and a few dashes Tabasco. Mix well. Put this mixture into the bowl with the vegetables and stir all together until the dressing has coated the vegetables thoroughly. Serve cold in saucers. ▼▼▼ TOMATO DAISHE SERVES 4 Although this combination is really a relish and more akin to coleslaw than to a salad, it may be substituted for the former with fish or seafood, and for the latter with most other dishes, especially meats. It is valuable, too, if one of your guests—there is unlikely to be more than one at a time—does not like salads. There are such people, as Bela Lugosi used to say after each performance of Dracula. Most of them find this arrangement pleasing and refreshing despite their aversion to leafy salads. Tomato Daishe is also an appetizing change for people who do like salads. 2 RIPE TOMATOES 1 SMALL CUCUMBER 4 SPRING ONIONS ¼ CUP MAYONNAISE Cut the tomatoes and the cucumber into dice, not too fine, and slice the onions, including most of the green tops, into pieces about half an inch long. Put all together in a small bowl and mix well with the mayonnaise to coat lightly. French Dressing (qv) may be substituted for mayonnaise, or you may season the mixture with salt and pepper only. Io any case, serve well chilled in saucers. ▼▼▼ BEET DAISHE SERVES 4 Like Tomato Daishe, Beet Daishe is a relish and is related to cole slaw, but more nearly approaches a salad than do either. It is more appropriate after fowl or meat than after seafood, this time including fish. Usually only fresh vegetables should be used in salads, but in this instance tinned, cooked baby beets are as good as fresh ones and are quicker. Cooking beets requires time, chilling them requires more, and they then must be sliced. Tinned beets need only be sliced. "Daishe" is an English transliteration of an old dacoit word meaning to "chop or slice fine," used to describe what dacoits did to their victims.
  10. 10. Photo owned by Beet Man 2 CUPS CHOPPED CELERY 1 CUP COOKED BABY BEETS 2 SPRING ONIONS 2 EGG YOLKS, HARD-BOILED 1½ TABLESPOONS VINEGAR 4½ TABLESPOONS OLIVE OIL SALT PEPPER 4 LARGE LETTUCE LEAVES The celery should be diced small, and the beets and onions sliced thin. Put the cooked egg yolks through a sieve into a mixing bowl, or mash them in the bottom. Add the vinegar and make a paste with the egg yolks. Add the olive oil, salt and pepper to taste, and stir vigorously. Add the chopped celery, beets, and onion. Mix them well with the dressing. Place a lettuce leaf on each salad plate, add a portion of the daishe to each leaf, and serve cold. This reproduction is made possible by Susan Alexander Truffles. If you’re interested in one more delectable salad recipe, drop by our website.

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